Pileus capping cumulus in MD

 

Pileus_RichardBarnhill_EasternMD_12Aug2014

Pileus atop cumulus congestus, Richard Barnhill (eastern MD, 12 Aug 2014)

This beautiful picture was taken by Richard Barnhill in eastern MD on 12 August 2014. The sun is highlighting the tops of growing cumulus congestus clouds, which are capped by another cloud, called a pileus cloud. Pileus is Latin for “cap” and resembles lenticular clouds that are also highlighted in this atlas. Lenticular clouds form when moist stable air encounters a mountain barrier, whereas these pileus clouds form when moist stable air is disrupted by the growing cumulus cloud below.

Strong updrafts occur within these growing cumulus clouds, defined by their well-defined edges and tufted appearance. If the air above is moist and relatively stable, but is forced upward by this strong upward motion from the cloud below, it can cool to its dewpoint, leading to condensation and the formation of this pileus cloud. This happens quite rapidly and the pileus cloud does not last long as typically the cumulus cloud beneath continues to grow through it.

Here is a schematic we created to try to simply explain this process:

Screen Shot 2014-08-28 at 4.48.35 PM

Schematic showing formation of pileus (courtesy of the Community Cloud Atlas admins)

The following series of images shows another example of a pileus cloud, where the cumulus below quickly produced this cap cloud and then grow through it to form a mature cumulonimbus.

CumulusGrowth_JamesStaileyJr_BentonAR_17Aug2014_annotated

Example of cumulus growing through the pileus cloud

Here is yet another great example of a pileus cloud, sent to us from North Carolina back in May. Notice how clearly it sits atop the cumulus congestus cloud, resembling a cap cloud hugging the top of a mountain barrier.

Pileus_BlakeSmith_NorthCarolina_18May2014

Pileus atop growing cumulus, Blake Smith (North Carolina, 18 May 2014)

The term “pileus” isn’t unique to clouds, however. Another example of this “cap” feature is given for the tops of mushrooms, such as shown in this diagram below. It’s great to see the commonalities in nature!

MD-fig1CD-pileus

“Pileus” term applied to mushrooms

 

Given that pileus are quite the fleeting phenomena, we are curious: have you seen a pileus? We would love to see your examples!

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